Two Kingdoms and Kuyperian Theology, a summary and critique by John Bolt

6 Sep

If you really want to get a feel for what this debate is all about, I highly recommend that you read John Bolt’s summary and critique of a debate between David Van Drunen (2KT) and Nelson Kloosterman (Kuyperian) on the Christ/Culture teachings of Herman Bavinck.  The article that Bolt writes well captures both views and he offers a sort of middle-ground position himself at the end.  Really good read.  You can get Bolt’s article and the audio from the original debate here, from the Bavinck Institute.

Ooops.  Here is the pdf of the article and here is a link to the audio of the debate (scroll down to it halfway down the page; real audio format)

4 Responses to “Two Kingdoms and Kuyperian Theology, a summary and critique by John Bolt”

  1. Wes White September 6, 2011 at 10:44 am #

    The link did not work for me, and I didn’t see the link for the article.

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    • thereformedmind September 6, 2011 at 2:45 pm #

      Sorry about that. I think I fixed it. Thanks for letting me know Wes.

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  2. Wes White September 7, 2011 at 5:22 pm #

    Thanks, Troy. That was a great read. I’m going to post on it sometime soon.

    A lot of things well worth thinking about. I agree with the two kingdoms distinction as defined by classic Reformed theology, and I do think that nature is an appropriate and important category. I think Bolt describes well here, though, that the Bible does address topics of “nature” and gives us more clarity than we might have had not only because of our own limited knowledge but also because of the propensity of the fall to distort our understanding of nature.

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    • thereformedmind September 7, 2011 at 8:29 pm #

      This issue just won’t go away for me. It’s tough. I have a hard time with 2KT approaches which say that matters pertaining to the sacred realm are of no significance or relevance in the secular realm. I have problems with neo-Kuyperians who deny the existence of the secular realm. Unfortunately, the middle-ground position (there is a secular realm that is distinct from but not irrelevant to the sacred realm) does not lend itself to nice tight easy categories and has all sorts of gray implications.

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