Thanks for admitting that atheism, like Christianity, is a worldview involving faith. But that doesn’t mean all worldviews are irrational

14 Oct

Two cheers. I can appreciate the recognition from the atheist author that all worldviews, including atheism, are based on a priori assumptions (non-provable presuppositions that amount to faith). But that doesn’t mean that the necessity of faith in worldviews is necessarily unsupported by or unrelated to reason and evidence. It doesn’t mean that all belief systems are hopelessly irrational exercises or mythology trips. For instance, “16 For we did not follow cleverly devised tales when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of His majesty. 17 For when He received honor and glory from God the Father, such an [a]utterance as this was [b]made to Him by the Majestic Glory, “This is My beloved Son with whom I am well-pleased”— 18 and we ourselves heard this [c]utterance made from heaven when we were with Him on the holy mountain” (2 Peter) and ” Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the things that have been accomplished among us, 2 just as those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word have delivered them to us, 3 it seemed good to me also, having followed all things closely for some time past, to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theophilus, 4 that you may have certainty concerning the things you have been taught.”

So while I agree that atheism reduces to irrational belief, it’s not because atheism is a worldview.

Excerpt from the article in The Atlantic by Crispin Spartwell:

Religious beliefs are remarkably various. But sometimes it can seem that there is only one way to be an atheist: asserting, on the basis of reasoned argument, that belief in God is irrational. The aging “new atheists”—Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, and Daniel Dennett, for example—pit reason against faith, science against superstition, and declare for reason and science.

It pictures the universe as a natural system, a system not guided by intelligent design and not traversed by spirits; a universe that can be explained by science, because it consists of material objects operating according to physical laws. In this sense, atheism embodies a whole picture of the world, offering explanations about its most general organization to the character of individual events.

Ironically, this is similar to the totalizing worldview of religion—neither can be shown to be true or false by science, or indeed by any rational technique. Whether theistic or atheistic, they are all matters of faith, stances taken up by tiny creatures in an infinitely rich environment.

I’m an atheist because I think of the universe as a natural, material system. I think of it, on the basis of my own extremely limited experience, as an infinitely replete but morally indifferent thing. It isn’t bent on saving me, or damning me: It just is. I find comfort in that, as well as pain; wonder as well as loathing. That’s my experience, and my atheism is a reflection of that experience. But it’s not an argument; it’s an interpretation.

I have taken a leap of atheist faith.

Whole article 

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: